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Knoll-Sponsored Exhibit Bauhaus twenty-21: An Ongoing Legacy Opens at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville Oklahoma

February 21, 2014

Bauhaus twenty-21: An Ongoing Legacy, a traveling exhibition featuring Knoll classics that “offers a unique perspectives on Bauhaus design philosophy as it relates to today's society,” is now on display at the Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

The exhibition, which first opened at the German Architecture Museum in Frankfurt, Germany in March of 2009, showcases Bauhaus furniture designs still manufactured by Knoll. Since its opening , Bauhaus twenty-21 has toured in Krakow, Nice, Munich, Stockholm, Ljubljana, Bratislava and Brussels.

The exhibition highlights twelve of the most iconic achievements of Bauhaus architecture built before 1933. Each of the buildings is featured in conjunction with a project built in this century by a group of up-and-coming as well as internationally prominent practitioners. The display includes:

  • House am Horn in Weimar, Germany, designed in 1923 by Georg Muche and Adolf Meyer, in conjunction with House of the Present in Munich, Germany, designed in 2005 by Allmann Sattler Wappner Architects.
  • Director's Office in Weimar, Germany, designed from 1923—31 by Walter Gropius, in conjunction with Law Office in Düsseldorf, Germany, designed in 2004 by Architect Thomas Pink of Petzinka Pink Architects.
  • Bauhaus Building in Dessau Germany, designed from 1925—26 by Walter Gropius, in conjunction with Federal Environmental Agency in Dessau, Germany, designed in 2003 by Sauerbruch Hutton Architects.
  • Masters' Houses in Dessau, Germany, designed from 1925—26 by Walter Gropius in conjunction with Villa Roser in Skara, Sweden, designed in 2005 by Wingårdhs.
  • Dessau-Törten Estate in Dessau, Germany, designed from 1926—28 by Walter Gropius, in conjunction with Solar Estate in Freiburg, Germany, designed in 2002 by Rolf Disch.
  • Balcony Access Houses in Dessau, Germany, designed from 1929—30 by Hannes Meyer, in conjunction with Student Housing in Garching/Munich, Germany, designed in 2005 by Fink+Jocher.
  • Employment Office in Dessau, Germany, designed from 1927—29 by Walter Gropius in conjunction with Employment Office in Reutte, Austria, designed in 2006 by Hanno Vogl-Fernheim.
  • Steel House in Dessau, Germany, designed from 1926—27 by Georg Muche and Richard Paulick in conjunction with M-Lidia House in Montagut/Girona, Spain, designed in 2003 by RCR Architects.
  • German Trade Union School in Bernau, Germany, designed from 1928—30 by Hannes Meyer in conjunction with Zurich International School in Wädenswil/Zurich, Switzerland, designed in 2002 by Galli & Rudolf.
  • Apartment House Weissenhof Settlement in Stuttgart, Germany, designed in 1927 by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in conjunction with Housing Guldbergsgade in Copenhagen, Denmark designed in 2002, by Ingvartsen Architects.
  • Director's Office in Weimar, Germany, designed from 1923—31 by Walter Gropius, in conjunction with Law Office in Düsseldorf, Germany, designed in 2004 by Architect Thomas Pink of Petzinka Pink Architects.

In conjunction with the exhibition, an illustrated book entitled, Bauhaus twenty-21: An Ongoing Legacy, presents Bauhaus ideas on architecture and design in a contemporary context and is comprised of historical texts based on interviews with Michael Siebenbrodt, director of the Bauhaus-Museum in Weimar, as well as contributions from an international group of prominent architects, accompanied by Gordon Watkinson's photographs.