• Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer
  • Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer
  • Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer
  • Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer
  • Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer
  • Knoll Breuer Laccio Coffe Table by Marcel Breuer

KnollStudio®

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Laccio Coffee Table

Marcel Breuer ca. 1925

Like his Wassily and Cesca chairs, Marcel Breuer’s Laccio Tables are critical to the story of 20th-century design. Breuer’s use of tubular steel to define lines in space—beautifully exhibited in these simple nesting tables—revolutionized furniture construction and inspired many subsequent generations of designers.

Details

Construction and Details
  • Top available in black, white and red
  • Top has MDF core with a smooth plastic laminate in a satin finish
  • Base is seamless tubular steel with polished chrome finish
  • Four plastic glides snap into pre drilled holes on base of the table
  • The KnollStudio logo and signature of Marcel Breuer are stamped into the base of the table
  • Laccio Side Tables can nest over the Laccio Coffee Table
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified®

 

Downloads for Laccio Coffee Table

General Info

Planning Tools

Finishes

  • color Black
  • color White
  • color Red
VIEW ALL FINISHES

Dimensions

In an interview with a Knoll historian, Marcel Breuer described how he came to begin experimenting with bent tubular steel while at the Bauhaus:

“At that time I was rather idealistic. 23 years old. I made friends with a young architect, and I bought my first bicycle. I learned to ride the bicycle and talked to this young fellow and told him that the bicycle seems to be a perfect production because it hasn’t changed in the last twenty, thirty years. It is still the original bicycle form. He said, “Did you ever see how they make those parts? How they bend those handlebars? You would be interested because they bend those steel tubes like macaroni.”

“This somehow remained in my mind, and I started to think about steel tubes which are bent into frames—probably that is the material you could use for an elastic and transparent chair. Typically, I was very much engaged with the transparency of the form.”