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KnollStudio®

Power Play™ Chair and Ottoman

Item #94L

Frank Gehry 1990

Inspired by the surprising strength of the apple crates he played on as a child, Frank Gehry created his thoroughly original collection of bentwood furniture. The ribbon-like designs transcend the conventions of style by exploring, as the great modernists did, the essential challenge of deriving form from function.

 

Starts at: $7980

 

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Customer Service: 800 343-5665

NYC Home Design Shop: 212 343-4190

 

Design & Plan

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Details

Construction and Details
  • Seat cushon available in a range of KnollTextiles and Spinneybeck® leathers for both the chair and ottoman
  • ¾” thick high resiliency foam used for cushions. Cushions snap-lock to the underside of the chair
  • Frame constructed of hard white maple veneer strips, laminated 6 to 9 thick with high-bonding urea glue
  • Thermo-set assembly glue provides structural rigidity without the need for metal connectors
  • To maximize tension compression, limited assembly glue is used in woven seat: weaves flex in unison for spring-like comfort
  • Chair back flexes for added comfort
  • Clear plastic glides with matte frost finish included
  • Ottoman has one pair of legs that can be locked in upright position to create a slanted leg and foot rest, or can be folded underneath for low foot rest or floor cushion
  • The underside of each piece is embossed with the Knoll logo and Frank Gehry’s signature
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified®

Dimensions

Neither party knew what lay ahead when Frank Gehry came to Knoll in 1989 with an idea for a new generation of bentwood furniture inspired by the simple bushel basket. Despite the uncertainty, a studio was set up and, fueled by mutual optimism, the investigation began.

“Everything I’ve always done has been a reaction against the usual expectations of the furniture market. I wanted the chair to come out of my own work, the shapes of my buildings… What the Knoll people first said to me was, ‘It probably won’t work, but maybe it will. You’ve been thinking about it. Something will come of it.’ All bentwood furniture until now has relied on a thick and heavy main structure and then an intermediary structure for the seating. The difference in my chairs is that structure and the seat are formed of the same incredibly lightweight slender wood strips, which serve both functions. What makes this all work and gives it extraordinary strength is the interwoven, basket-like character of the design… It really is possible to make bentwood furniture pliable, and springy and light.”*

After three years of experimentation and exploration, the collection was debuted in the Frank Gehry: New Furniture Prototypes show at The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

*From an interview originally run in Architectural Record (c) February 1992, The McGraw-Hill Companies. www.architecturalrecord.com.
 

One of the most celebrated architects of the second half of the 20th century, Frank Gehry has made a career of pushing boundaries and questioning what architecture can do. After studying at UCLA, Gehry pursued his graduate studies at Harvard's Graduate School of Design. He has served on the faculty at Harvard and Yale, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. Gehry was awarded the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1972.

His most famous buildings include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhine, Germany and the Dancing House in Prague, Czech Republic. His collection of cardboard furniture, Easy Edges, set a new precedent for the use of materials in furniture making.

Gehry created his bentwood furniture collection for Knoll in 1992. Inspired by the surprising strength of a wooden bushel basket, he sought to fully integrate material and design, creating a structurally and aesthetically light masterpiece. He explained:

“…all bentwood furniture until now has relied on a thick and heavy main structure and then an intermediary structure for the seating. The difference in my chairs is that structure and the seat are formed of the same incredible lightweight slender wood strops which serve both functions. The material forms a single and continuous idea. What makes this all work and dives it extraordinary strength is the interwoven, basket-like character of the design.”
 

From an interview originally run in Architectural Record (c) February 1992, The McGraw-Hill Companies. www.architecturalrecord.com.