Butler Coffee Table

Lewis Butler 1953

Lewis Butler was one of the first designers who came to Knoll specifically to work for the Planning Unit - Florence Knoll's revolutionary design consultancy devoted to office interiors. His tables reflect Florence's attention to detail and design sensibility, taking simple forms and refining them to perfection.

Finishes

  • color Black Laminate
  • color White Laminate
  • color Natural Oak
  • color Ebonized

Dimensions

Additional Info

Construction and Details
  • Tabletop is particle board with white and/or black high gloss laminate finish
    • Rectangle table has two sections, which can be specified in black/black, black/white or white/white
    • Square table has four sections which can be all black, all white, or checkerboard
  • Base is offered in natural oak, or with an ebonized finish on beech
  • Legs are connected with mortise and tenon joinery

 

Configure Butler Coffee Table

The configurator below is for reference purposes only. All options, finishes and sizes may not be represented. For the complete scope, please refer to the KnollStudio price list.


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Pratt Institute graduate Lewis Butler was one of the first designers who came to Knoll specifically to work for the Planning Unit — Florence Knoll’s revolutionary design consultancy devoted to office interiors.

In 1950 he became a senior designer and assistant to Florence Knoll. He later recalled that “[Florence] would do the rough outline, and I would develop it and refine it further. I became an extension.” When Florence left the company in 1965, Butler became head of the Planning Unit.

As was the case with the work of many Planning Unit members, Butler’s furniture designs were often intended to fill in the space between what Florence called the ‘star pieces’ of Bertoia and Saarinen. His simple designs were appropriately subtle and thoroughly modern. Ever-interested in visual and structural simplicity, an identifying mark of Butler's work is the wooden joint he often employed to avoid the use of excess hardware.