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KnollStudio®

Bertoia Asymmetric Chaise

Item #429L

Harry Bertoia 1952

The Asymmetric Lounge is the most sculptural of Harry Bertoia’s 1952 wire chair collection. The chair never made it beyond a prototype until 2005, when Knoll, with help from Bertoia’s family, put the design into full production.  Harry Bertoia’s wire collection is among the most recognized achievements of mid-century modern design and a proud part of the Knoll heritage.

 

Starts at (retail): $6435

 

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NYC Home Design Shop: 212 343-4190

 

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Details

Construction and Details
  • Available with a seat pad or full cover in a range of KnollTextiles
  • Seat pad snaps on to the frame with domed snap buttons
  • Full cover attaches directly to the frame with hidden mono-filament and metal hooks
  • Seat and base are constructed of welded steel rods
  • Available in polished chrome and highly durable white and black Rilsan finish
  • Black and white Rilsan finish suitable for outdoor use
  • Plastic glides included on sled base to protect floors
  • Knoll logo stamped into the back of the base
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified®

Dimensions

In Harry Bertoia’s original presentation of his wire chairs to Hans and Florence Knoll in 1950, he showed a chaise longue version, essentially the large diamond chair extended on two of its sides, hence the use of the term asymmetric in reference to its shape. At that time the complexity of production of all of Bertoia’s chairs was still years from being resolved by Knoll Design and Development, and as a result the decision was taken to not develop the chaise.

Two prototypes were made. In 2003 one of them was sold by Bertoia’s family and at that point Knoll obtained access to the chaise in order to use it as a model for reproduction. The original chaise was intended to be covered with a full-length upholstered pad, designed by Richard Schultz. The final production version has an optional seat pad as well as the original full cover option.

©Brian Lutz

Harry Bertoia was a complete and gifted artist. Knoll historian Brian Lutz once said, “Bertoia’s paintings were better than his sculptures. And his sculptures were better than his furniture. And his furniture was absolutely brilliant.”

On the suggestion of Herbert Matter, who had worked alongside Eames and Bertoia, Florence and Hans traveled to California and encouraged Bertoia to move east and set up his own metal shop in the corner of Knoll’s production facility. Having studied with Bertoia at Cranbrook, Florence was sure that he would produce something brilliant if given the time and space to experiment.

While he only designed one collection of furniture, Bertoia continued to be involved in the Knoll story by providing sculptures and architectural installations for Planning Unit projects. He collaborated with Eero Saarinen to design the altar for the MIT Chapel. He spent the next 25 years of his life experimenting with light, sound and volume through sculptures, paintings and architectural installations.

Today Knoll carries on Harry Bertoia’s legacy of innovation, inspiration and beauty with the Bertoia collection, which has been in continuous production around the world since its introduction. In 2005 Knoll introduced the Asymmetric Lounge, a design from Bertoia’s initial experimentation that never reached production.