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Florence Knoll Bench

Florence Knoll 1954

Despite being what Florence Knoll modestly referred to as a “fill-in piece,” the Florence Knoll Bench now stands as a defining example of modern design. Consistent with all of her designs, the bench has a spare, geometric profile that reflects the objective perfectionism and rational design approach Florence Knoll learned from her mentor, Mies van der Rohe.

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Details

Construction and Details
  • Exposed metal frame and legs in heavy gauge steel and inner frame of solid wood
  • Seat suspension with No-Sag springs
  • Leather upholstery has matching buttons
  • KnollStudio logo and Florence Knoll’s signature are stamped into the base frame
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • Certified Clean Air GOLD
Additional Options Available by Phone (See Below)
  • View Approved KnollTextiles
  • Available in a range of Spinneybeck® leathers
  • Base available in satin chrome

Dimensions

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As head of the Knoll Planning unit, Florence Knoll always approached furniture design with the larger space in mind. Most important to her was how a piece fit into the greater design — the room, the floor, the building. Every element of a Knoll-planned space supported the overall design and complemented the existing architecture.

Never one to compromise, Florence would often design furniture when she, “needed the piece of furniture for a job and it wasn’t there.” And while she never regarded herself as a furniture designer, her quest for harmony of space and consistency of design led her to design several of Knoll’s most iconic pieces—all simple, none plain.

As skyscrapers rose up across America during the post-war boom, Florence Knoll saw it as her job to translate the vocabulary and rationale of the modern exterior to the interior space of the corporate office. Thus, unlike Saarinen and Bertoia, her designs were architectural in foundation, not sculptural. She scaled down the rhythm and details of modern architecture while humanizing them through color and texture. Her lounge collection, designed in 1954, is a perfect example of her restrained, geometric approach to furniture, clearly derived from her favorite mentor, Mies van der Rohe.

 

 

 

Discover the Florence Knoll Lounge
Collection in the Archive

Since 1938, Knoll has brought together people and ideas to create inspired objects and spaces. The Archive connects these People, their Products and the Events that shape the Knoll story. Explore the Archive in three views: Timeline, Connections and Grid.

 

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