Florence Knoll Dining Tables

Florence Knoll 1961

With her typical modesty, Florence Knoll described her own line of desks as the “meat and potatoes” which had to be provided. “I did it because I needed the piece of furniture for a job and it wasn’t there, so I designed it.” Florence Knoll’s designs are reserved and cool, severe and angular, reflecting the objective perfectionism of the early 1960s.
 

Finishes

Marbles are available with shiny or satin finish. Glass only available on mini desk.

  • color Arabescato
  • color Calacatta
  • color Carrara
  • color Grigio Marquina
  • color Clear Glass

Dimensions

Additional Info

Construction and Details
  • Top has transparent polyester coating in polished or satin finish to help eliminate use-associated stains
  • Legs are solid steel bars connected to horizontal steel tube rails using steel connectors
  • 78" and 94" Tables have an added cross bar between the rails and a tension rod substructure help support the weight of the marble top and prevents any deflection of the marble
  • Legs and rails have polished chrome finish
  • KnollStudio logo and Florence Knoll’s signature are stamped into the base of the table
Sustainable Design and Environmental Certification
  • GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certified®

 

Configure Florence Knoll Dining Tables

The configurator below is for reference purposes only. All options, finishes and sizes may not be represented.
For the complete scope, please refer to the KnollStudio price list.
(60" x 36" table shown)


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As head of the Knoll Planning Unit, Florence Knoll always approached furniture design with the larger space in mind. Most important to her was how a piece fit into the greater whole — the room, the floor, the building. Every element of a Knoll-planned space supported the overall design and complemented the existing architecture.

Never one to compromise, Florence would often design furniture when she “needed the piece of furniture for a job and it wasn’t there.” And while she never regarded herself as a furniture designer, her quest for harmony of space and consistency of design led her to design several of Knoll’s most iconic pieces—all simple, none plain.

As skyscrapers rose up across America during the post-war boom, Florence Knoll saw it as her job to translate the vocabulary and rationale of the modern exterior to the interior space of the corporate office. Thus, unlike Saarinen and Bertoia, her designs were architectural in foundation, not sculptural. She scaled down the rhythm and details of modern architecture while humanizing them through color and texture.

Among these were a series of End Tables that, in their slim frames, extended the aesthetic of modernism to every corner of the office. In celebration of the designer’s 100th birthday, Knoll introduced new products to the Florence Knoll Collection, including a line of Dining Tables and a Mini Desk, that echo the successful forms of her past designs and translate Shu’s architectural sensibilities from the corporate office to the home.

Born to a baker, and orphaned at age twelve, Florence Schust grew up Saginaw, Michigan. Schust demonstrated an early interest in architecture and was enrolled at the Kingswood School for Girls, adjacent to the Cranbrook Academy of Art.

While at Kingswood, Florence befriended Eilel Saarinen, whom she would later study under at Cranbrook. Warmly embraced by the Saarinen family, Florence seeded in Michigan the foundations of her incredible design education and pioneering career. Florence went on to study under some of the greatest 20th century architects, including Gropius, Breuer, and Mies. In 1941 Florence moved to New York where she met Hans Knoll who was establishing his furniture company. With Florence’s design skills and Hans’ business acumen and salesmanship, the pair, who married in 1946, grew the nascent company into an international arbiter of style and design. In creating the revolutionary Knoll Planning Unit, Florence Knoll defined the standard for the modern corporate interiors of post-war America.

After the tragic death of Hans Knoll in 1955, Florence Knoll led the company as president through uncertain times. In 1960 she resigned the presidency to focus on directing design and development and, in 1965 after pioneering an industry and defining the landscape and aesthetic of the corporate office, Florence Knoll Bassett (she remarried in 1957) retired from the company. Her contributions to Knoll, and to the rise of modernism in America, are immeasurable.