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An Angular Abode in East Hampton

The addition of a dramatic extension brings about a unified spatial re-configuration

Marie-Ève and Michel Berty’s East Hampton house had already undergone two major renovation projects by the time they enlisted the help of architect Maziar Behrooz. Having come from France, the couple’s home represents a dramatic departure from the Parisian boulevard’s strict containment of architectural overflow, an upshot of George-Eugène Haussmann’s renovation of Paris in 1870. 

Maziar Behrooz Designs Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Matthew Carbone.

In love with the natural beauty of Long Island, the pair set about reimagining the property without necessarily observing the natural confines of the property's topography. The resulting angular treatment of space unifies the pool, grounds, and garden in a holistic manner.

A significant amount of work went into the front of the house, which was lengthened using a dramatic triangular extension that juts out in parallel with the pool. Behrooz then went about creating a series of terraces to "add an element of verticality to the naturally flat topography." On each tier, Marie-Ève had an assortment of native flora and vegetation planted, emulating the beautiful terraced farms of Asia.

Maziar Behrooz Designs Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Matthew Carbone.

The plan also called for a small adjacent cottage, which was integrated into the fold of the new wing.

Maziar Behrooz Designs Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Matthew Carbone.

Integral to the redesign was Marie-Ève’s expansive art collection, which includes, among other things, a towering totemic sculpture from New Guinea. The sheer size of some of Marie-Ève’s artwork necessitated consideration in Behrooz’s new floorplan. 

Maziar Behrooz Designs Hallway for Marie-Ève and Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Mark Roskams.

When it came time to redo the interior, Marie-Ève took it upon herself to review the home’s furnishings, but called on the professional counsel of her friend Tracey Garet, an interior designer. From the sinuous lines of the dining room to the angular trusses in the home office, Garet and Marie-Ève employed pieces from Knoll sparingly, allowing the architectural form of each individual room to dictate the furniture needs.

Office with Charles Pollock Executive Chairs for Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Mark Roskams.

The pair chose the soft curves of Charles Pollock’s Executive Chairs to balance out the strong linearity of the exposed I-beams in Berty’s office. The chairs’ motorcycle-black leather complements the textural tone set by the metallic conference table. 

Maziar Behrooz Dining Room with P&eaigu;pe Cortes' Jamaica Barstools for Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Mark Roskams.

The dining room’s eclectic collection of Buddhist statues and Rococo-esque candlesticks is counterposed with modern lines of the room's barstools and Verner Panton’s Lounge Chairs.

Maziar Behrooz Designs Stairway for Marie Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Mark Roskams.

Perhaps the most noticeably dramatic feature of the interior is the vinyl-red colored floor. Tonally it affects the whole mood of the house, reflecting subtle changes in the sun’s light over the course of the day, honoring the architect Louis Kahn’s observation that “the sun never knew how wonderful it was until it fell on the wall of a building.”

Maziar Behrooz Designs Pool for Marie-Ève & Michel Berty's East Hampton Residence

Photograph by Matthew Carbone.

Project Credits:

Design: Maziar Behrooz
Photography: Matthew Carbone & Mark Roskams

 

Pollock Executive Chair
Pollock Arm Chair